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Topic: Anita Dolman

Even If They’re Not What You Would Have Wanted: Ian Williams editor of The Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology 2018

The prizes and shortlists were not your decision. Let that go. It’s too late to reconsider anything.

The Poetry of Mortality: Evelyn Lau’s Tumour

Although Evelyn Lau’s Tumour is a solid poetry collection on a timeless topic, I’m inclined to warn anyone currently suffering from depression to avoid it. Lau’s collection cuts more keenly than much of Canada’s poetry of hurt, slicing through the tissue of artifice, into the marrow of pain.

A Flashing Light in the Darkness: Kim Fu’s How Festive the Ambulance

Canadian-born Seattleite Kim Fu has followed up her much-lauded debut novel, For Today I Am a Boy (HarperCollins, 2014), with a debut collection of poetry. With it, she proves she is no less afraid of portraying emotion and complexity as a poet than as a novelist.

How Festive the Ambulance is divided into five sections, each themed around the relationships her miserably modern characters have with different parts of the world around them, from animals, to loved ones (and things), to culture, to place. Despite the divisions, each poem throughout the book is wound in a tangle of influences and affects, all tied to contemporary lifestyles.

Raw Precision: Eva H.D.’s Rotten Perfect Mouth

With Rotten Perfect Mouth, Eva H.D. leaps onto Canada’s poetry stage as an unknown, the book imparting her first published poetry. It would have been a risk for Mansfield Press, had H.D.’s voice been less strong, her imagery less vivid and haunting, or her sense of what troubles us less exact.

From train graffiti to the history of chewing gum, H.D. focuses with keen precision on the magnificent, rotten details of daily living.