Arc 77 – Canada’s Simple Alternatives Poetry Magazine

Kevin Shaw’s “Turing’s Time Machine” takes 1st prize in the Poem Of The Year contest.
Amber Homeniuk earned the Readers’ Choice with her poem “by the time he hit the floor,” and Sneha Madhavan-Reese’s p…

Arc 76: Canada’s Squirming Creature Poetry Magazine

In this issue of Arc Poetry Magazine, a year of Sylvia Legris’ mentorships as Arc’s Poet-In-Residence comes to an end.

With new work from Legris and four exceptional poets fostered by Legris’ mentorship, the Po…

Chapbook Reviews

Arc Poetry Magazine will soon introduce a short section of chapbook reviews.

Scheduled to begin this summer, the reviews will focus on recent Canadian work. 
They may be detailed discussions of a single chapbook or may b…

Posts related to the Tag: Poetry »

Hine Recollected

by James Pollock

Roseanne Carrara on Adam Getty’s “Yellow Grass”

Experiencing “for the first time” a sense of dislocation, the speaker of Adam Getty’s “Yellow Grass” promises a new understanding of his place in the world. And he delivers on this promise by envisioning another person and admiring the dynamism of that person’s imagination. Sustaining his initial “wonder” in the surrounding countryside by wondering who might know it intimately, the speaker conjures a person so familiar with the field that he has “named each one of these blades” and identified every “kink” in the grass…

Ron Charach on Dave Margoshes’ “Latimer’s Statement to the Police”

Writing poems based on journalistic reportage is perilous at the best of times. The poems risk becoming too freighted with the politics or moral implications of the event itself. Yet no poet, or poetic novelist, with blood in their veins can steer clear of the stranger-than-fiction events that fill the newspapers and airwaves. Regina poet and novelist Dave Margoshes takes on both the unspeakable and the ineffable in this poem about Robert Latimer’s decision to kill of his severely disabled daughter Tracy. The poem was written several years after the [...]

Zachariah Wells on Alfred G. Bailey’s “Elm”

In one of the most famous pieces of poetic shlock ever penned, Joyce Kilmer muses that he “shall never see / A poem lovely as a tree.” “Tree” is not merely the first syllable of treacle, however, and trees–despite poets’ best efforts to abet deforestation through publication–are almost always positive emblems when they appear in a poem–even while forests are often dark and terrible zones. A.G. Bailey seems to suggest that if all Kilmer and others can see is arboreal loveliness, then they probably can’t see the forest for the [...]
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